WEC Newsletters

Elections 101

Elections education is a key part of establishing election security and integrity. Elections 101 is a four-part video series that explains how elections are carried out in Wisconsin. The goal is to: a) create better awareness and understanding of how election administration works in our state and b) through that understanding, establish more trust in the process.

Each of the four videos is about 6 minutes long explores various aspects of elections administration in Wisconsin. The videos and accompanying lesson plans are intended to be used in high school classrooms as a part of civics education, and also are available to the general public here and in many other places.

Elections Overview

An overview of elections administration in Wisconsin, this introductory video touches briefly on a number of topics that will be explored in greater detail in subsequent videos.

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Nuts and Bolts

In this video we explore the ins-and-outs of voter processes like registering to vote, requesting a ballot to vote absentee, and similar hands-on activities.

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Voting Security

Let's take a look at how we maintain security and integrity with all of our elections, from voting machine testing and certification to maintaining an accurate voter registration database.

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A Day at the Polls

From getting directions from the greeter to filling out a ballot and getting a sticker when you're done, see what it is like to go to the polls and vote!

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Military and Overseas Voters

If you are a military member or a U.S. citizen living overseas, there are federal and state voting protections in place and special procedures you can follow for voting.

What Type of Voter Are You?

    You are a “Military Voter” if you are:

    • A member of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps or Coast Guard, the Commissioned Corps of the Federal Public Health Service or the Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    • A member of the merchant marine of the United States

    • A civilian employee of the United States and civilians officially attached to the uniformed services who are serving outside the United States

    • A Peace Corps volunteer

    • A spouse or dependent of someone listed above, if you live with or accompany them

    Temporary Overseas Voters are U.S. citizens and Wisconsin residents who are temporarily living outside the United States, who intend to return to Wisconsin, and who are otherwise qualified to vote.

    Wisconsin’s temporary overseas voters may now receive their absentee ballots electronically – by email or fax – making it easier to vote when they are outside the country. They may now also use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB).

    You are a permanent overseas voter if you are a U.S. citizen who last resided in Wisconsin, or your parent last resided in Wisconsin, before moving to a foreign country, and you have no intent to return to your prior municipality in Wisconsin. 

    How to Complete the Voting Process

        Military electors are exempt from registration. However, you will need to provide information similar to someone registering to ensure you get the correct ballot.

        Temporary Overseas Voters must be registered to vote, and are required to provide proof of residence when registering. Please note that the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) serves as both a voter registration form and absentee ballot request.  See more about how to complete and return the FPCA here.

        A permanent overseas voter is required to register to vote, but is not required to provide proof of residence. Please note that the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) serves as both a voter registration form and absentee ballot request. See more about how to complete and return the FPCA here.

          • A military voter can request and receive an absentee ballot online at My Vote WI: myvote.wi.gov

          • You can also complete a Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) and mail, fax or email it to your municipal clerk

          • Or, you can notify your municipal clerk in writing (by mail, email, or fax) that you are a military voter and are requesting an absentee ballot

          • Clerks must receive a military elector’s absentee ballot request no later than 5 p.m. on the Friday before an election

          • For elections containing a national office on the ballot, military electors who are on active duty away from their residence may request an absentee ballot until 5 p.m. on Election Day

          • Temporary Overseas Voters may request a ballot by mail, fax or email.

          • Temporary Overseas Voters have until 5 p.m. on the 5th day before the election to make a request. 

          • Temporary overseas voters who are not registered must postmark their registration by the 3rd Wednesday before the election in order to vote.

          • An absentee ballot request may be made online at https://myvote.wi.gov or by fax or email to the municipal clerk.

          • If the absentee ballot does not arrive in time, you may use the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB), which is available online, and at U.S. embassies.

          • See more about how to complete and return a FWAB here.

          • A permanent overseas voter can request and receive an absentee ballot online at MyVote WI: myvote.wi.gov.

          • You can also complete a Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) and mail it to your municipal clerk (the FPCA serves as both voter registration AND absentee ballot request).

          • Permanent overseas voters who are not registered must postmark their registration by the 3rd Wednesday before the election in order to vote.

          • Permanent overseas voters can request an absentee ballot up until 5 p.m. on the 5th day before the election.

          • Permanent overseas voters are only eligible to vote in elections that contain a federal office.

            • Military electors can choose to receive their absentee ballot by mail, email, or fax. You may not return your voted ballot electronically.

            • Military electors can access their absentee ballots online at My Vote WI: myvote.wi.gov

            • If a mailed absentee ballot does not arrive in time, you may use the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB), which is available online, at U.S. embassies, and from Military Voting Assistance Officers

            • The ballot is mailed, faxed, or emailed per the voter’s request. If the voter does not specify the means of transmission, the clerk may send the ballot via whatever means are practical to expedite receipt of the ballot by the voter.  

            • Temporary overseas voters who do not receive their ballots in time may use the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB), which is available online and at U.S. Embassies. Please consult the directory of U.S. Embassy web sites.

            • See more about how to complete and return a FWAB here.

              • You must mark your ballot in the presence of a witness (a military voter's witness need not be a U.S. Citizen)

              • After you vote your ballot, place it in the envelope, and complete the absentee ballot certification

              • Make sure you sign and date the certificate, provide your date of birth, have a person sign as a witness, and provide the witness' address

              • Return your absentee ballot to your municipal clerk by mail

              • The absentee ballot must be received no later than 8 p.m. on Election Day.  The U.S. Postal Service recommends absentee ballots be mailed one week before Election Day to arrive on time

              • You must mark your ballot in the presence of a witness (an overseas voter's witness does not need to be a U.S. Citizen).

              • After you vote your ballot, place it in the envelope, and complete the absentee ballot certification.

              • Make sure you sign and date the certificate, provide your date of birth, and have another person sign as a witness, and provide the witness' address.

              • Return your absentee ballot to your municipal clerk by mail.

              • All voted absentee ballots must be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day. All voted absentee ballots must be returned by mail to the clerk's office and cannot be returned electronically. Please allow enough time to return the ballot. If you are unable to use public mail or parcel services, consider commercial alternatives.

              • You may only vote for federal offices.

              • You must mark your ballot in the presence of a witness (an overseas voter's witness does not need to be a U.S. Citizen).

              • After you vote your ballot, place it in the envelope, and complete the absentee ballot certification.

              • Make sure you sign and date the certificate, have another person sign as a witness, and provide the witness' address.

              • Return your absentee ballot to your municipal clerk by mail.

              • The absentee ballot must be postmarked by Election Day, and received by 8 p.m. on Election Day. Please allow enough time to return the ballot. If you are unable to use public mail or parcel services, consider commercial alternatives.

              • arcel services, consider commercial alternatives.

              Voter Outreach

              Online Voter Engagement

              To assist municipal and county clerks with voter outreach ahead of upcoming elections, the Wisconsin Elections Commission will prepare and share suggested social media posts for clerks to use on their own Facebook, Twitter, or other social media pages.

              The goal of these resources is to help clerks provide information to voters about important election-related dates and deadlines, and to inform them of the ways that Wisconsin ensures accurate and secure elections.

              Voter Guides

              The WEC has produced many resources for clerks and other groups to help voters understand all aspects of the voting process, including Wisconsin's Photo ID law. Please use the resources below.

              Poll Worker Training Requirements

                New chief inspectors are certified to conduct elections in the current 2022-2023 term once they have completed all seven sections of the Baseline Chief Inspector Training presentation and the Chief Inspector Self-Evaluation. This course is available in the Learning Center or can be offered in person by a clerk.

                Chief inspectors need to obtain another four hours of approved election training - for a total of six hours - by December 31, 2023 to recertify for the 2024-2025 term.  All chief inspectors need at least six hours of approved election training every two years to maintain their certification.

                Wisconsin statutes require that all election inspectors receive training at least once every two years.* §7.315(1)(b), Wis. Stats.  The municipal clerk must provide this training and should document that the inspectors have been trained.

                Currently, there is no specific prescribed curriculum or length of training.  It is recommended that, at a minimum, election inspectors be instructed on the duties detailed in the Election Day Manual.  It is the responsibility of the municipal clerk to ensure that election inspectors have received sufficient training prior to commencement of duties. 

                 

                There is a Poll Worker Training Series available on the Learning Center. Ask your municipal clerk for access.

                If you have/are a high school student who is interested in becoming a poll worker for an upcoming election, there is a self-paced, self-directed course available in the Learning Center.

                This course is a series of activities that includes the student getting the permission to work the election and submitting that form to the clerk, learning about the different roles and activities that happen on election day, and even covers some state statutes they should be aware of like electioneering and the requirements to be a High School poll worker.

                To enroll a student in the course, have the student get guardian consent to have a Learning Center account (see form attached below) and email a scanned copy of that form along with the request for an authorized user to @email. If you would like an overview of the course before you enroll a student, email us and we will be happy to set that up!

                General Poll Worker Training Topics

                The videos that correspond to each training topic below can be found on The Learning Center and on the WEC Vimeo channel.

                  Thank you for your service and congratulations on your appointment!  Being a poll worker is a difficult job, but we know you are up to the challenge.  There are many procedures to understand and the rules for elections in Wisconsin are always changing, which makes your role even more difficult.  We appreciate your dedication to serving voters and facilitating the democratic process here in Wisconsin.  Here is some basic information about your position:

                  • Sworn election official who takes oath of office for a two-year term (except High School student election inspectors).

                  • As a poll worker you are required to receive training before serving in support of your first election.

                  • As a poll worker you are entitled to be compensated for your work and your employer is required to allow you leave on Election Day to work as a poll worker.

                  • You may be appointed from a party list but your job is to ensure voting goes smoothly on Election Day and all eligible voters can cast a ballot.

                  Your job is to facilitate democratic process, and not to act in the interest of a specific party when doing the following:

                  • The polling place must be set up to process voters by 7:00 am on Election Day.

                  • You should be ready to process voters when they arrive at the polling place.

                  • You can use cell phones, read books, crosswords, etc. when there is down time in the polling place, but you should use good judgement when doing so.

                  No electioneering at the polling place, which is defined as any activity intended to influence voter’s ballot choices.

                  • Attire – no politically-themed attire or materials/clothing/buttons supporting a candidate, political party or ballot initiative.

                  • Conversation – no conversations about ballot candidates, political platforms of candidates, incumbency information or opinions on ballot initiatives such as referenda.

                  • Other political conversations: Avoid other political topics of conversation that could violate electioneering rules and make voters uncomfortable.

                  • Literature: polling places should not have any literature (signs, flyers, posters, newspapers, etc.) that could potentially influence voter’s ballot choices.  Those materials should be removed or covered up during voting hours.

                  Assistance to voters is appropriate and welcome in many situations.

                  • Assistance can be provided during all aspects of the voting process including helping a voter move around the polling place.

                  • All voters are eligible to use the accessible voting equipment and poll workers should make that option known to voters.

                  • All poll workers should be familiar with all voting equipment used at the polling place, including the accessible voting equipment.

                  • All voters are eligible to receive assistance, either from a poll worker or from anyone of their choosing (provided it is not their boss or labor union representative).

                  • Voter Registration – You can help with explaining and filling out the form to assist the voter.

                  • State Name and Address – If a vopter cannot state their name and address at the poll book, a poll worker or assistant may state the name and address on the voter’s behalf.

                  • Poll Book Signature – A voter may be exempted if voter cannot sign the poll book due to disability.  A voter can sign using an ‘X’ if that is their regular signature or mark.

                  • Voting – A voter can be assisted with filling out the ballot or using the accessible voting equipment.  The assistor must fill out the section on the ballot for assistor information to have that information recorded on the poll list.

                  • Poll workers may assist voters with placing a ballot in box or machine.

                  • Curbside voting is required to be offered at each Wisconsin polling place regardless of the presence and availability of accessible voting equipment

                  Treat all voters with respect and courtesy!

                  • Don’t presume anything about a voter’s eligibility or abilities based on their appearance.

                  • Many voters have disabilities that are not apparent at a quick glance.

                  • Others may appear to have certain/limited abilities but are able to participate independently or with limited assistance if required accessible voting equipment is available and proper assistance is provided.

                  • Flexibility is key when communicating with voters of varying abilities.  Ask a voter about their needs and how they prefer to communicate!

                  • Use people first language.  Use phrases like ‘voter who uses a wheelchair’ and ‘voter with a hearing impediment’.

                  • The ability to understand the voting process and instructions in English is not required of voters.  Many U.S. citizens speak a language other than English as their primary language.  These voters are allowed to have an assistant interpret for them as they navigate the polling place and vote.

                  • Avoid commentary to voters or other election officials about voter’s names, appearance, perceived qualifications, or perceived abilities.

                  • All voters should be treated the same and are subject to the same set of rules, even friends, family and neighbors.

                  The polling place should be welcoming to voters and observers, and the focus should be on the orderly processing of voters throughout Election Day.

                  • Observers are allowed in the polling place but must behave in accordance with the rules and should not cause a disturbance.

                  • Observers should remain in the observation area and should not interact with voters, unless the voter requests their assistance.

                  • Observers who cause a disturbance may be removed at the request of poll workers, particularly the Chief Inspector, if they are unwilling to leave when asked.

                  Polling place set up and management increases the ability for voters to participate without unnecessary assistance.

                  • The voting area should be set up to allow for good voter flow.

                  • Accessibility is essential, including good lighting in the voting area and on pathways both inside and outside the building.

                  • Use a checklist to ensure all standards being met and to review the polling place before the polls open to ensure space set up for good voter flow.

                  • Make sure all voting equipment is set up and functioning when polls open.  Poll workers should be familiar with the equipment and able to answer voter questions about how they work.

                  • Periodically review the polling place to make sure nothing has changed during the day or any political literature is not available.

                  • Ensure that supplies such as pencil, paper, signature guides and page magnifiers are available for each election.


                  Documentation is important.

                  • Use the Inspector’s Statement to document any incidents that occur on election day, especially incidents such as ballot jams on the voting machine that may impact the vote totals at the end of the night.  

                  • These notes will help you reconcile at the end of the night and help the various Boards of Canvassers to recreate the events of Election Day when certifying election results.  

                  • Actions such as using the override function on the voting equipment, remaining a ballot and asking an observer to leave the polling place are great examples of things that should recorded on the log.

                  • When in doubt, write it down!

                  Having a proper understanding of the voting equipment used in the polling place is an integral duty of an election inspector.  In addition to being familiar with the normal operation of the equipment, it is also important to know how to maintain and secure the equipment during an election, how to explain its use to an elector, how to assist an elector if requested, and who to contact if something goes wrong.  

                  By having a more in-depth understanding of the voting equipment, election inspectors can help ensure both the accuracy and security of elections while maintaining voter confidence in the electoral process. 

                  Voting Equipment Types

                  Municipalities throughout Wisconsin use a variety of voting equipment.  Regardless of the municipality or the vendor with whom they work, however, voting equipment is broken down into three main categories: optical scan equipment, ballot marking devices and direct recording electronic (DRE) equipment.  In some cases, municipalities may use a combination of these equipment types in their polling places. 

                  Optical Scan Tabulators

                  • This equipment tabulates votes by scanning ballots as they are fed in by the voter.

                    • Depending on the municipality, optical scan ballots will either require the voter to complete an arrow or fill in an oval to indicate their vote. 

                  • It is important to understand how optical scan tabulators’ function, as voters may have questions about the proper use of the equipment. 

                    • Election inspectors should not only understand how to set up, turn on, and shut down the equipment, but should also know how to address ballot jams and how to interpret any error screens or warnings that the equipment may display when a ballot is inserted. 

                    • Certain types of equipment may have auxiliary ballot bins in addition to the primary storage receptacle into which ballots are deposited after they are tabulated.  Inspectors should be aware of any additional bins and their functions.

                    • Inspectors should also know where all the tamper-evident seals on a piece of equipment are located, as the serial numbers from these seals must be recorded in the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104). 

                  Ballot Marking Devices (BMD)

                  • Ballot marking devices are ADA-compliant voting machines that can mark a ballot on behalf of the voter.

                  • There are several different types of BMDs approved for use in Wisconsin, and your polling place may have an ExpressVote, ImageCast Evolution (ICE), ClearAccess or AutoMark.

                  • Poll workers should familiarize themselves with the basic functions of the machine so they can explain how it works to voters.  They should be familiar with the following procedures:

                    • Proper machine set up that accounts for accessibility and privacy

                    • Turn the machine on and off

                    • Activate the correct ballot style

                    • Change ink cartridge (if applicable)

                    • Navigate the screens and make ballot choices, including adding write-ins

                    • Print ballot, or ballot card

                  • Poll workers may need to activate the correct ballot style on the machine if a voter wishes to use the machine to assist them.

                  • To use these machines, the voter inserts an unvoted ballot, or ballot card, and uses the touchscreen to make their choices.

                  •  At the end of the voting process, the voter is provided with a summary screen that details their choices and allows them to revisit contests to change their votes.

                  • The voted ballots, or ballot cards, are then scanned by the optical scan tabulator or placed in a ballot box.

                  • Poll workers can gain experience with the machine by using it to vote themselves on Election Day or by practicing during the public test.

                  • All voters may use the accessible equipment and it should be set up by the opening of polls in a visible place in the voting area.

                  Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) 

                  • As with optical scan equipment, certain DREs also tabulate votes electronically.  However, DREs differ in that they are touchscreen devices that allow the voter to mark his or her ballot directly on the equipment. 

                  • DREs employ what is known as a Voter Verifiable Paper Audit Trail (VVPAT), which, depending on the equipment, will either mark the voter’s choices on a feedable roll of paper or on a paper ballot for verification.  The VVPAT is considered the official ballot. 

                    • Election inspectors should know how to address and document issues with the VVPAT, which may jam or misfeed while a ballot is being cast.  It is also important to have a general understanding of how to load or refeed the paper roll into the equipment, as it will likely need to be replaced during an election. 

                  • To comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), every polling place must have at least one piece of accessible equipment set up, readily available, and ready for use by any elector during an election.  As with optical scan equipment, it is imperative that election inspectors understand how this equipment works so that they may either explain its functions to or assist an elector with casting a ballot. 

                  • Accessible equipment should be set up to eliminate any physical barriers and to ensure both the privacy and independence of anyone who may need to use it. 

                  • Inspectors should know where all the tamper-evident seals on a piece of equipment are located, as the serial numbers from these seals must be recorded in the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104). 


                  Voting Equipment Procedures

                  Prior to Election Day

                  • Inspectors should be trained on proper use and maintenance of any equipment being used in the polling place in advance of Election Day. 

                    • At a very basic level, this training should include how to turn the equipment on, how to turn it off, how to cast a ballot, and how to explain any of these processes to an elector. 

                    • Inspectors should also be aware of how to address common issues, e.g., ballot jams, paper roll replacement, or ballot errors such as overvotes, crossover votes, etc., that may come up while electors are casting votes. 

                  • In addition to training, clerks should also provide appropriate contact information to inspectors as to whom to contact if an equipment issue or malfunction cannot be readily resolved. 

                    • Suggestions for key points of contact on this matter are typically the clerk’s office or a representative of the vendor that manufactured the equipment.  

                  • It is also suggested that inspectors attend a pre-election voting equipment test.

                    • These tests, required by statute, ensure that the equipment tabulates votes accurately and correctly.

                    • By attending these public tests, inspectors can supplement any existing training on the equipment by assisting with the test deck of ballots, feeding the ballots into the equipment, and by more closely observing the reconciliation process on a smaller scale. 

                  Election Day

                  • Placement of voting equipment is an important aspect of setting up the polling place.  All equipment should be set up to ensure:

                    • That it is easily accessible (particularly with regard to accessible voting components).

                    • That it is private.

                    • That all components necessary for using the equipment are also present. 

                  • Prior to opening polls, and prior to any ballots being cast, election inspectors must witness a test of any tabulators in the polling place to ensure a zero count. 

                    • Inspectors must print a report showing a zero-count for all candidates and referenda on the ballot.  Witnesses should also verify that the counter on the equipment is correctly set at zero.

                    • This report must be signed by the officials witnessing the test and should not be separated from the rest of the paper roll. 


                  Security procedures:

                  • At the start of Election Day, the serial numbers on all tamper evident seals in a polling place must be recorded on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).  The serial numbers on the EL-104 will be reviewed and compared at the end of the day to verify that the seals are intact and have not been tampered with in any way. 

                    • Tamper evident seals are placed in various places on a piece of equipment.  Inspectors should be aware of and document serial numbers from all seals on the equipment, including the serial number of any memory device used by the system. 

                    • While not a requirement, it is also recommended that inspectors review and verify the seal numbers throughout the day to confirm that they match the information recorded on the Inspectors’ Statement. 

                    • If there are any security concerns with the equipment, inspectors should notify the Chief Inspector or the clerk immediately. 

                    • Depending on the municipality and the polling place, the clerk may have additional security procedures that inspectors should be aware of and adhere to throughout Election Day. 

                  • Throughout the course of the day, inspectors should monitor the equipment to ensure that it is functioning properly and that voters are not having/causing any issues with the equipment.  

                    • Any issues with the equipment, including jams, accidental misfeeds, etc., should be documented on the Inspectors’ Statement accordingly. 

                    • Depending on the type of equipment used, it is likely that the VVPAT paper roll or ink cartridges will need to be replaced multiple times throughout the day.  Inspectors should be able to complete these processes efficiently and correctly. 

                    • It is necessary to have enough paper ballots on-hand for every elector.  This is especially important in the event of an equipment malfunction that renders the equipment unusable. 

                  • An inspector may be asked to explain the equipment or to assist an elector in casting a ballot, so it is key that there is not only an understanding of the equipment itself, but a clear understanding of the ballot and all offices, candidates, and referenda that appear on it. 

                  • After the polls have closed, inspectors should once again verify that the serial numbers on the equipment’s tamper evident seals and any memory devices conform with the numbers previously recorded on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                    • This verification must occur prior to any seals being broken or any memory devices being removed from the equipment. 

                  • Inspectors must then print a results report (tape) on each piece of equipment.  

                    • One copy of this report and any memory device from the equipment must be placed in a sealed container, which must then be signed by the chief inspector and two additional inspectors. 

                    • Alternatively, memory devices may remain sealed in their respective pieces of equipment. 

                  • Depending on the equipment used, inspectors may have to manually compile results from DRE equipment with results from optical scan equipment.  It is important to have a set procedure in place if this process is necessary. 

                  Frequently Asked Questions

                  What happens if the optical scan or direct recording electronic equipment malfunctions? Whom should you contact? 

                  • The clerk should be contacted top assist with fixing the problem.  They may be able to assist over the phone or they may have to contact the vendor to help address the problem.

                  What is a voter verifiable paper audit trail, of VVPAT? 

                  • A voter-verified paper audit trial is a paper ballot or paper record on one’s votes that can be hand-counted, in necessary.  For optical scan voting the VVPAT is the actual ballot, or ballot card, and for DRE voting it is the ballot receipt that is generated when each voter sues the machine. 

                  At what point on Election Day should the tamper evident seals be verified against the numbers on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104)?

                  • Those numbers are required to be verified before the polls open and also at the close of polls, but it is a great practice verify them on shift change and at other points during the day.

                  Who is allowed to cast a ballot on a piece of accessible voting equipment? 

                  • Any voter who either wants or needs to use that equipment.  It must be made available to everyone, not just voters who would benefit from the use of the equipment.

                  A zero-count result report should be printed by each piece of equipment prior to opening the polls.  Should this report be kept with the primary results report or securely stored separately until polls close? 

                  • The zero report should be kept attached to the results report and stored securely with other election materials after the polls close.

                  If a tamper evident seal has been broken during Election Day, what is the appropriate course of action? 

                  • You should document this incident on the Inspectors Statement and contact your clerk immediately.  

                  If a poll worker is unable to explain how to correctly use a DRE or accessible voting device, is it appropriate to have the voter complete an optical scan ballot by hand instead?

                  • No, the voter is still entitled to use the machine and the clerk should be called so that proper instruction can be provided.  

                  What are some common equipment issues that should be recorded on the Inspectors’ Statement?  

                  • Some common issues include, ballot jams, equipment malfunctions, changing paper rolls, emptying ballot bins, verifying tamper-evident seal numbers, and using the override function.

                  What are some problems that an inspector should be able to resolve without escalating the issue to the chief inspector or the clerk’s office? 

                  • Some of these problems include basic operation of the equipment, such as turning it on/off, clearing jams, changing paper rolls, explaining basic functions of the machine to voters, emptying ballot bins, and transmitting election results are good examples of problems and tasks that poll workers should be familiar with.

                  The preparation of the polling place is crucial to maintaining a functional Election Day.  Organizing the polling place to allow for the orderly flow of voters and familiarizing yourself with the different forms and materials will allow for a successful opening of the polls and efficient Election Day.

                  Preparing the Polling Place

                  • Show up early to your polling place

                    • Polls open at 7:00 a.m. and it is important that you have enough time to prepare the polling place and have all necessary documents completed before the first voter casts their ballot. Check with your municipal clerk on what time you are expected to be at the polling place on Election Day.

                  • Establish an official clock

                    • The clock on the voting equipment isn’t always accurate, so the inspectors should identify an official clock and note this on the inspector’s statement.  Cell phones accurately keep time and frequently serve as official clocks.

                  • Be familiar with the traffic flow on Election Day

                    • It’s recommended that the voter registration, check-in and voting areas are separate to ensure a smooth flow of voter traffic

                    • The way a polling place is set up impacts the voting experience and your ability to do your job.  Make sure to keep in mind the general flow of voters through the room and voting process, and to make sure that everyone can vote privately and cast their ballot independently, including voters using any accessible voting equipment.

                  • Signage

                    • Traffic to and through the voting area can be improved by posting “Enter,” “Exit,” and “Voter Registration” signs in appropriate places. In addition, signs marking the accessible entrance and path should be prominently posted and easy to read from the parking lot.

                    • All signage should be printed in size 18 font or larger.

                    • Directions that instruct voters to state their name and address, provide proof of identification and sign the poll book are optional, but can make the check-in process more efficient.

                    • Place a sign outside the polling place with information on how a voter can get assistance with curbside voting.  

                  • Observer Area

                    • Anyone, other than a candidate on the ballot, can observe the polling place.  

                    • A designated observation area should be identified in the voting area that permits observers to readily observe all public aspects of the voting process. When physically possible, the observation area should be no less than 3 feet, or more than 8 feet from the table where electors are announcing their name and address, signing the poll list and being issued a voter number and the table where Election Day registration is occurring. Observers should be placed so that they can hear the interactions of voters with election officials, but not so that they interfere with the voting process.

                    • Observers may not handle or inspect proof of residence or photo ID documents.  

                  Necessary Forms
                  Your municipal clerk will have created a packet containing the various forms that you will need to use during Election Day.  Review the forms to ensure that all necessary documents are completed and easily located if they are needed.

                  • Forms and Supplies

                    • Ballots and Sample Ballots

                      • What is it?

                        • Two sample ballots for every ballot style must be posted at the polling place. These sample ballots have all of the contests that will be voted on during that day’s election.

                      • Where should they be placed?

                        • A location where voters can easily locate and review.

                    • Ballot Bags (EL-101)

                      • What is it?

                        • There should be a ballot bag for each ballot style per reporting unit. If you have a consolidated ballot, you only need one per reporting unit.

                        • If you are a hand-count municipality, you may need to have a county, state, and federal bag, a municipal bag, a school district bag, and potentially a referenda bag.

                      • Where should they be placed?

                        • The ballot bags should be placed away from voters, in a spot that the Election Inspectors can locate.

                    • Envelope for Rejected Certificate Absentee Ballot Envelope (EL-102)

                      • What is it?

                        • Election officials place all Rejected Absentee Ballot Certificate Envelopes (EL-122) in the brown carrier envelope.  

                        • Must be returned to the clerk who provided it for that election.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Rejected Certificate Absentee Ballot envelope should be placed away from voters, in a spot that Election Inspectors can locate when processing/rejecting absentee ballots.

                    • Envelope for Used Certificate Absentee Ballot Envelopes (EL-103)

                      • What is it?

                        • Election inspectors place the Used Absentee Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-122) in the white carrier envelope after determining it has been properly executed and after removing the absentee ballots.  The used envelope is returned to the clerk who provided it for that election.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The envelope for Used Certificate Absentee Ballot envelope should be placed away from voters, in a spot that Elections Inspectors can locate when processing absentee ballots.

                    • Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104)

                      • What is it?

                        • All challenged, spoiled, damaged, defective, remade, objected to and rejected ballots must be documented using this form.

                        • This statement should provide an accurate account of the election inspectors’ decisions concerning all ballot irregularities and describe any other occurrences or irregularities at the polling place (that may or may not affect the validity of the election). If in doubt, document it on the Inspectors’ Statement.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Inspectors’ Statement should be placed in an easy to access location, away from voters. This will be a document used relatively frequently throughout the day.

                    • General Purpose Tally Sheets (EL-105)

                      • What is it?

                        • Election inspectors or tabulators use tally sheets for counting hand-count paper ballots and recording the number of votes cast for each candidate.  This includes write-in votes, or in the case of a referendum, the yes and no votes.

                        • Where optical scan ballots are used, a write-in tally sheet is used to count and record write-in votes.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The General Purpose Tally Sheet should be placed in a location that is easy for election inspectors to find at the end of the night, when doing any of the necessary hand counts.

                    • Municipal Canvass Report (EL-106)

                      • What is it?

                        • The municipal board of canvassers completes this report, certifies the municipal election results, and officially determines the winners.

                        • In municipalities with one ward or where all wards vote at a single polling place and results are combined, the election inspectors constitute the municipal board of canvassers for that election

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Municipal Canvass Report should be placed in a safe and secure location away from voters, in a spot that the Chief Inspector can locate.

                    • Poll List and Supplemental Poll List (EL-107): (also known as the poll book, voter list or the registration list)

                      • What is it?

                        • The poll book contains the names and addresses of registered voters in a ward or combination of wards.  Each ward or combination of wards will have two poll lists, which must be maintained identically on Election Day.  Election inspectors use poll lists to ensure only registered voters cast a ballot, and to capture certain information about each registered voter who receives a ballot.

                        • Note:  Voters need to sign only one copy of the poll list.  All voters should sign the same poll list.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Poll List and Supplemental Poll List should be located and staffed at the designated sign in table. The Poll Lists need to be located on a table where both Election Inspectors and voters have easy access.

                    • Registered Write-In Candidate List

                      • What is it?

                        • The municipal clerk should supply elections inspectors with a list of registered write-in candidates on Election Day.  

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Registered Write-In Candidate List should be placed in a location that can be easy accessed by Election Inspectors but should NOT be posted with election notices.  The list is given to voters upon request.

                    • Ineligible Voter List

                      • What is it?

                        • The list of felons in a county or municipality that are currently under the Department of Correction’s supervision.  These individuals are on probation, parole, or extended supervision and are ineligible to vote.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Ineligible Voter List should be located near the check in table or EDR location as those two areas will be using it the most throughout election day.

                    • Inspectors’ Certificate of Provisional Ballots (EL-108)

                      • What is it?

                        • Election inspectors use this envelope to secure any provisional ballots voted on Election Day.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • This should be placed in a secure location away from voters, in a spot that the Chief Inspector can locate.

                    • Election Observer Form (EL-109)

                      • What is it?

                        • Individuals who wish to observe the conduct of the election and/or election administration event should legibly list their  full name, street address and municipality, and the name of the organization or candidate the observer represents, if any.

                        • The observer shall also sign this form acknowledging the observer understands the rules and will abide by them.

                        • Additionally, an observer must present photo identification to an election inspector.  Any type of photo identification is acceptable so long as it features a photo of the observer and the observer’s name.

                        • An election official shall verify by marking on the EL-109 that the observer’s name listed on the EL-109 matches the photo identification.  

                    • If the information on the photo identification does not match the information on the observer log, the individual shall not be permitted to serve as an observer.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Election Observer Form should be placed near the designated area where Election Observers are to observe.

                    • Order to Leave Polling Place (EL-110)

                      • What is it?

                        • In the event that a chief inspector orders an observer to leave a polling place, the chief inspector shall provide this written order to the observer which includes the reason for the order and the signatures of the chief inspector as well as another election inspector representing the opposite political party, if available.  

                        • The chief inspector shall have sole authority to order the removal of an observer, but the other election inspector may note whether they agree or disagree with the decision on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Order to Leave Polling Place form should be placed away from voters, in a spot that the Chief Inspector can locate.

                    • Election Observers Rules-At-A-Glance

                      • What is it?

                        • This brochure is available from the WEC website.  It is a summary of the rules for election observers and a copy should be provided to all individuals who wish to observe the conduct of the election and/or election administration event.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • The Election Observers Rules-At-A-Glance should be placed near the designated area where Election Observers are to observe.

                    • Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelopes (EL-123)

                      • What is it?

                        • Each provisional ballot is placed in a separate provisional ballot certificate envelope.  Every provisional voter must complete the certification and seal his or her ballot inside the envelope.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • This should be placed in a location away from voters, in a spot that the Chief Inspector can locate, near the other Provisional Ballot materials.

                    • Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r)

                      • What is it?

                        • Election inspectors use this form to record the details of each provisional ballot issued on Election Day.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • This should be placed in a location away from voters, in a spot that the Chief Inspector can locate, near the other Provisional Ballot materials.

                    • Absentee Ballot Log (EL-124)

                      • What is it?

                        • This form should be used to track absentee ballots at the polling place to indicate whether the vote was counted.

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • This should be placed in a location away from voters, in a spot that the Election Inspectors who process Absentee Ballots can locate.

                    • Presidential Only Ballot Forms: 

                      • What is it?

                        • Presidential elections require two additional forms.  These forms are used for individuals who moved to Wisconsin less than 28 days before a presidential election.  These individuals are eligible to vote in the presidential contest only.

                        • Authorization to Cancel Registration - New Wisconsin Resident (EL-139)

                        • Application for Presidential Ballot (EL-141)

                      • Where should it be placed?

                        • These should be placed in a secure location away from voters, in a spot that the Chief Inspector can locate.

                  Voter Information and Notices

                  General Rules

                  The following documents need to be posted at the polling place in location that is easy for voters to find. The font size of these documents should be at least 18 point:

                  • Notices

                    • Relevant portions of the voting instructions from the Type B notice, the text of the Type C notice for each referendum, if applicable, and the Type D notice of polling place hours must be posted.

                  • Sample Ballots: Two copies of each type of ballot

                  • Statement of Election Fraud (EL-111): Documents the laws and applicable penalties for election fraud.

                  • Notice of Crossover Voting (EL-112): Explains the effect of crossover voting at a partisan primary and is posted at a partisan primary only.  The EL-112m should be used in municipalities that use optical scan voting equipment.

                  • Notice of the Effect of Overvoting (EL-113): Explains the effect of overvoting in a particular contest and how to obtain a replacement ballot if a voter makes a mistake.

                  • Voter Qualification Poster (EL-115): explains the requirements for an individual to be a qualified elector.

                  • Voting Rights (EL-117): provides general information on voting rights protected by federal law.

                  • Contact Information (EL-118): provides electors with contact information if they have concerns with the voting process.  The blank sections should be filled in before Election Day by the municipal clerk.

                  • Ward Maps (required) & Street Directory (recommended): indicating all the wards in the municipality served by that polling place and which streets are in each ward along with the location of each polling place.

                  Review ballot and contingency plans

                  • Ballot

                    • Together with other inspectors, review and familiarize yourself with the ballot.

                      • Inspectors should know what offices and referenda are on the ballot.

                    • Communicate any registered write-in candidates and the office they are pursuing.

                    • Note if you have different ballot styles at your polling place and ensure that there are separate processes to ensure that voters get the correct ballot with the correct contests.

                    • Count back 50 ballots from the bottom of the pile and place a Post-It or other note that there are 50 remaining ballots.

                      • If you get to this point, have the chief inspector contact your municipal clerk to have more ballots delivered.

                  • Contingency Plan

                    • Review the contingency plan for your polling place and determine who will be responsible for what should there be an emergency evacuation of the polling place during Election Day

                    • Review potential contact information and ensure that all contact information is accurate and up to date.

                  Ensure voting booths are set up correctly

                  • Every polling place needs at least one booth per every 200 electors who voted in the last general election.

                    • It does not matter if it is going to be a “small turnout election” – The booths still need to be set up and ready for voters.

                    • All booths must be set up in the same area (including any accessible equipment or tables) but need to be separate from the check-in and registration tables.

                  • Accessibility

                    • At least one booth needs to be at least 30 inches wide with a writing surface between 28 and 34 inches high to meet accessibility standards.

                    • Keep in mind that this booth needs to be accessible to people using a mobility device, such as a wheelchair, and needs to be private.

                    • Accessible voting equipment must be turned on and facing away from the general public – all voters using the accessible equipment must have the ability to vote in private and not have their selections shown to people passing by.  The equipment should also be set up with enough clear floor space to allow for wheelchair access.

                    • All election inspectors should be trained on how to use the accessible voting equipment and should be able to explain to a voter how to mark a ballot on the equipment.

                    • The equipment should be tested as part of the pre-election test.  

                  Tabulators and Ballot Boxes

                  • Tabulators

                    •  If you are using optical scan equipment, verify that the tamper evident seal is intact, and record the number in the inspector’s statement.

                      • The chief inspector compares the serial numbers recorded on the inspectors’ statement to the serial numbers on the security tags on the machine at the beginning and end of the day. The chief inspector should initial in the spaces provided to confirm that the checks were completed and the seals were intact.

                    • All inspectors should be trained on how to use the voting equipment and should know how to:

                      • Turn the equipment on and off

                      • Be able to explain to an elector how to cast a ballot on the equipment

                      • Be able to properly load and unload the voter-verified paper audit trail (VVPAT), also known as the paper roll

                      • Know who to contact if there is an issue with the voting equipment

                    • Print the Election Day Zero-Count tape

                      • Before any ballots are cast on Election Day, inspectors need to witness a test of the tabulation component by performing a zero-count test to ensure that the machine will start counting at zero.

                      • The zero-count tape is required to be signed by the witnesses and should not be separated from the remainder of the roll.  Leave the printout attached to the roll.

                  • Ballot Boxes

                    • If your polling place uses hand count paper ballots, you will need to have a ballot box for each ballot used in the election.

                      • Even if direct recording electronic (DRE) equipment is primarily  used at the polling place, you still need a ballot box to process absentees, assisted ballots, challenges ballots, etc.

                    • There needs to be enough paper ballots at the polling place for every voter, regardless if they usually use the DRE equipment or not.

                    • Each ballot box needs to be clearly labeled to indicate which ballots can be deposited there.

                      • If you have more than one reporting unit at a polling place, you will need to have one ballot box per ballot per reporting unit.

                    • Each ballot box needs to be securely locked. 

                      • Lock should be reviewed periodically by the chief inspector to verify that the ballot box hasn’t been tampered with.

                  Frequently Asked Questions
                  What can I tell voters about referenda?

                  • Voters asking about referenda should be referred to the posted copy of the Type C notice containing the text of the referendum and an explanatory statement of the effect of a “yes” or “no” vote.  Straying from these official documents could persuade the voter to vote a certain way and could be grounds for dismissal of the election inspector.

                  Should I post the names of write-in candidates?

                  • No.  Inspectors will be given a list of registered write-in candidates that they can show a voter if specifically asked for the list, but this list should not be listed publicly.

                  What should I be writing in the Inspector’s Statement (EL-104)?

                  • Anything and everything.  The Inspector’s Statement is the official explanation of Election Day and can be used to figure out discrepancies.  When in doubt if you should record information in the Inspector’s Statement or not, always record it.

                  Greeters may be the first person a voter sees and interacts with at the polling place on Election Day. Greeters need to be able to work courteously with the public.  

                  Greeters should, at a minimum, acknowledge voters and assist them in opening the doors if needed.  Additionally, greeters can serve as a resource for answering questions about the polling place and where an elector needs to go to register to vote or receive a ballot.  

                  A greeter can help the traffic flow in the polling area by directing voters quickly to the correct location or table for registration or poll book check-in.  The greeter position can be especially beneficial during high turnout elections.


                  Greeters may

                  • Direct voters to the correct ward, registration table or poll book table.  

                  • Answer general questions about the voting process or direct questions to the Chief Inspector.  

                  • Review a voter’s proof of residence and/or photo ID and advise the voter if the document(s) is acceptable.  The voter must still provide the document(s) to the election inspectors to register to vote or be issued a ballot.      

                  • Check to see if a voter is in the right polling place by searching the voter’s address in MyVote, on a district map or on another copy of the poll list.

                  • Direct voters to the correct polling place.

                  • Substitute for election inspectors taking a break if also trained and appointed as an election inspector.

                  • Assist with the curbside voting process.  

                  • Help maintain clear pathways for voters to enter and move through the polling area in an orderly manner.  

                  Greeters may not

                  • Participate in the canvass after the polls close.  

                  • Participate in any official election inspector duties, e.g. canvass, voter registration, issuing ballots, unless appointed as such an official to substitute for election inspectors during breaks, lunch, or as other needs arise.    

                  • Be counted toward the odd number of election inspectors required to be in the polling place on Election Day.  

                  • Issue voter numbers.

                  • Check a voter for acceptable proof of residence and/or photo ID in place of the election inspectors’ inspection of the documentation.

                  • Answer questions about the status of registered write-in candidates.

                  • Answer questions about the effect of a “yes” or “no” vote on a referendum.

                  Election Inspectors register voters at the polls on Election Day.  The clerk may also appoint Election Registration Officials (EROs) to register voters at the polls.  EROs do not count toward the odd number of election workers needed in the polling area on Election Day.  EROs can also be appointed as election inspectors and substitute for inspectors during breaks, lunch, etc.  At a voter’s request, an election inspector can assist a voter with filling out a voter registration application and filling out a ballot.  

                   

                  Voter Registration Application (EL-131) 

                  The application is broken down into 10 separate sections, plus an administrative section at the bottom of the form.

                  Section 1

                  • The voter should review these answers to ensure that they are eligible to vote. If they do not meet any of the qualifications, they should stop filling out the application.

                  Section 2 and 3

                  • The voter must provide last name, first name, middle name (if they have one) as it appears on the document provided in Section 8 and date of birth. Providing a phone number and email is optional and the information is subject to public record requests.

                  Section 4

                  • The voter lists current residential street address, including apartment, city, state and zip code.  

                  Tip: P.O. Boxes may not be listed as the residential street address.

                  • Mark Military or Permanent Overseas if applicable.

                  Tip: Military and permanent overseas voters do not have to provide proof of residence.
                  Sections 5 and 6

                  • Voters with a different mailing address as provided in Section 4 should list it in Section 5.  

                  • Voters should provide their previous name.

                  • Voters are required to provide the previous address if they were registered to vote at another location.

                  Tip:  Sometimes voters can’t remember their previous address, but may recall part of their previous address and/or municipality. 

                  Section 7

                  • If the voter has been issued an unexpired Wisconsin-issued driver license or identification card, the voter must provide the number.  

                  Tip: The voter is not required to present the driver license or identification card to election officials unless they are also using that document as proof of residence or photo ID.

                  • If the voter cannot or will not provide the number, they may vote provisionally.  

                  Tip: The driver license or identification card number must then be provided at the polling place by 8:00 p.m. or to the municipal clerk by 4:00 p.m. the Friday following the election.

                  Tip: Voters can call the DMV at (608) 7447 to get their DL#.

                  • If the voter has an unexpired Wisconsin-issued driver license or identification card, when the voter completes the EL-131, the voter must include the driver license expiration date in Box 2.  

                  Tip: If the voter does not have the license or know the expiration date, the election inspector should ask the voter if the license is unexpired. If the voter indicates that the license is unexpired, the election inspector should write “voter affirmed” in the expiration date field on the application. 
                   
                  Tip: If voter indicates the license is expired, the voter should be requested to list the driver license number for matching purposes but must list the last four digits of his or her Social Security number.  

                  • If the voter does not have a Wisconsin Driver License or state-issued ID card, the voter must list the last four digits of their social security number.

                  • If the voter has not been issued a Wisconsin Driver License or state-issued ID card, or a social security number, the voter should fill in the oval indicating they have neither.  

                  Section 8

                  •  Voter must provide proof of residence. Electronic POR is acceptable.

                  Acceptable Proof of Residence
                  (Must include voter’s name and Wisconsin residential address.)

                  • An unexpired Wisconsin driver license or receipt for license.

                  • A Wisconsin ID card that has not been cancelled or receipt for ID card. 

                  • Any other official ID card or license issued by a WI governmental body or unit. 

                  • Any ID card issued by an employer in the normal course of business and bearing a photo of the card holder, but not including a business card. 

                  • A real estate tax bill or receipt for the current year or the year preceding the date of the election. 

                  • A residential lease:  A residential lease should contain: Landlord and tenant names, address of the leased property, term of the lease, landlord and tenant signatures, and amount of rent.

                  • A university, college or technical institute identification card (must include photo, address not required) with one of the following:

                    • A fee payment receipt issued to the cardholder by the university, college, or technical college dated no earlier than 9 months before the date of the election. 

                    • A certified and current list of students who reside in housing sponsored by the university, college, or technical college showing the current address of the students. 

                  • A utility bill (gas, electric, water, sewer, telephone/mobile, cable/satellite TV, internet, etc.) for the period commencing not earlier than 90 days before Election Day. 

                  • Bank statement

                  Tip:  Credit card and mortgage statements are acceptable. Credit card offers are not.  

                  • Paycheck or paystub documentation of direct deposit. 

                  • A check or other document issued by a unit of government. Examples of government documents (not an exhaustive list): 

                    • Vehicle registration

                    • BadgerCare/Medicare statements (if issued by government agency)

                    • Social Security statements (if issued by government agency)

                    • Public school correspondence

                    • Federal student loan notices (if issued by government agency)

                  Tip:  Units of government include federal, state, county, municipal, school district, tribal, foreign, etc.

                  • A signed letter on public or private social service agency letterhead identifying a homeless voter and describing the individual’s residence for voting purposes.

                  • A contract or intake document from an occupant of a residential care facility that specifies that the occupant currently resides in the facility (a room number is not required).

                  Section 9

                  • Voter must sign and date the application, affirm that their application is accurate, and they are eligible to vote.

                  Section 10

                  • An election official or other individual who assists the voter filling out or signing the form should list their name and address.

                  Tip:  Any person can assist a voter, except for the voter’s employer or union representative.  

                  Tip: Explaining how to complete the form is not “assistance.” 

                  Section 11

                  • The election inspector should review the proof of residence and write the type.

                  • The election inspector should review the application form for completeness and eligibility before signing.

                  • The election official should check the Ineligible Voter List.  If the voter does not appear on the list, the election official should sign and date the form.

                  Tip:  Review for legibility and completeness before signing the form.

                  • If the voter does appear on the list, follow the procedure outlined in the Election Day Manual.

                  Back Side of Form

                  • A voter may indicate if they need accommodations at the polling place.

                  • If a voter is unable to provide a street number or address, they may indicate where they reside on the map provided.

                  Frequently Asked Questions

                  Does a voter have to show an election inspector their Wisconsin Driver License or state-issued ID card to list the number in Section 7?  

                  • Not unless the voter is also using the Wisconsin driver license or state ID card for proof of residence and/or photo ID.  

                  Can a voter who does not have an acceptable proof of residence document vote a provisional ballot?

                  • No, that is not one of the two situations when a voter should be offered a provisional ballot.

                  Can a voter list the last four digits of their social security number instead of listing the driver license number?  

                  • No, if a voter has an unexpired WI driver license or state-issued ID card, they must list the number.  

                  Can a voter be assisted filling out the voter registration application and/or signing their name on the form?

                  • Yes, by anyone other than a representative of their labor union or an employer.

                  Does the voter’s proof of residence document have to indicate that they have resided at their residence for at least 28 days before the election?

                  • No, the voter certifies that they resided in the district for at least 28 days by signing the affirmation on the voter registration application.

                  What if a voter has an unexpired Wisconsin driver license and doesn’t want to provide the number?

                  • The voter must be offered a provisional ballot.

                  Can an election inspector ask a voter who is eligible to vote provisionally to bring the documents to the polls before it closes so we don’t have to fill out all the paperwork?

                  • They can suggest it, but the voter doesn’t have to come back on Election Day and has until 4 pm the Friday after the election to provide the municipal clerk with the missing documentation.  

                  Do all forms of proof of residence have an account number?  

                  • No, for example, a letter from the municipal clerk probably won’t list an account number. It is not required if the POR document does not have an associated account number. 

                  Can a WI driver license with a hole punched through the date be used as proof of residence?  

                  • Yes, it can be used as POR for registration, but it cannot be used as photo ID for voting.  

                  Can an observer view the voter’s proof of residence document?  

                  • No, an observer is not eligible to view the voter’s POR.  

                  Unless the municipality uses Badger Books, two election inspectors maintain two duplicate poll books, also known as poll lists, voter lists or registration lists, for each reporting unit.  A reporting unit is a ward or combination of wards that reflect the way election results are tabulated and transmitted to school districts, the county and the Wisconsin Elections Commission.  

                  The poll books contain the names and addresses of registered voters in a reporting unit.  The poll books are generated in WisVote, Wisconsin’s statewide database for tracking voter registrations.  Each reporting unit will have two poll books, which must be maintained identically by the election inspectors on Election Day.  Poll books may consist of up to four parts:  (1) regular poll list, (2) pre-printed supplemental poll list, (3) handwritten supplemental poll list and (4) the confidential voters poll list.  

                  Some municipalities split their poll book alphabetically to keep voter lines more manageable in high turnout elections.  Election inspectors need to carefully issue and document the voter number issued to each voter on each poll book to ensure they are correctly distributed to voters.

                  Tip: Splitting the poll books alphabetically between A-K and L-Z helps keep lines even.  

                  Signs and verbal directions that instruct voters to state their name and address, provide photo ID and sign the poll book can make the check-in process more efficient.  

                  1.    Election inspector asks the voter to state their name and address.

                  • Wis. Stat. 6.79 (2) (a)  requires a voter to state name and address.  Voting is a public activity and observers and other voters have a right to know who is casting a ballot.  

                  Tip:  Confidential voters are not required to state their name and address.  They will provide a card with a unique voter number that matches their voter number in the confidential voter section of the poll book.    

                  • A voter may be assisted with stating their name and address, if unable to do so, by an election inspector or other individual.

                  • If the voter refuses to state their name and address, and is able to do so, the voter is not issued a ballot.

                  • Election Day registrations should be entered into both copies of the supplemental poll list.  

                  2.    Both inspectors locate the voter’s name and address in their respective poll books.

                  • If the voter has an “absentee issued” watermark next to their name, the voter should be asked if their ballot was returned. If the voter indicates the ballot was not returned, the voter is issued a ballot.  If the inspectors subsequently find an absentee ballot in the voter’s name, the absentee ballot is not counted, and the clerk is notified of a possible double voting situation.

                  • If the voter has an “absentee returned” watermark next to their name, the voter should be informed that they cannot vote a new ballot at the polls if they returned their ballot.  If the voter denies returning their ballot, the election inspectors should review the absentee ballot certificate envelopes to determine if the voter returned their absentee ballot.  If the voter subsequently casts a ballot at the polling place, the election inspectors may choose to challenge the ballot.  

                  • If the voter’s name does not appear in the poll book, the voter should be asked if they registered recently in the clerk’s office and has a copy of the Certificate of Registration (EL-133) issued by the clerk.  If they do not, the clerk or the WEC should be contacted to determine if the voter is registered.  If there is no record of an EL-133 for the voter, they will need to register to vote and is added to the supplemental poll list. 

                  • A confidential voter will have a number instead of an address recorded by their confidential voter listing in the poll book. 

                  3.    Election inspector asks voter for a photo ID.

                  • Election inspectors together compare the name on the photo ID to the name on the poll book. 

                  • The inspector verifies that the name on the ID conforms to the name on the poll list. The name on the photo ID may be a variation of the name on the poll list.  For example, “Robert” vs. “Bob,” variations of initials or upper or lower case letters, hyphenated names, etc.

                  • The inspector verifies that any photograph on the ID reasonably resembles the voter.

                  Tip:  Appearances change over time.  Poll workers should not comment on a voter’s appearance in the photo or in person – even if the comment is intended as a compliment.  

                  • The inspector verifies that the photo ID is unexpired or, if expired, meets the expiration specifications listed below.

                  • If the election inspectors do not believe that either the name conforms to the name of the registered voter or the photograph does not reasonably resemble the person in front of them, they may refuse to accept the photo ID.

                  Note: The address on the photo ID does not have to be current.  Also, the election inspectors do not have to determine that the voter’s signature matches the signature on the poll list

                  • If voter does not have acceptable photo ID, they must be offered a provisional ballot.

                   
                  Acceptable Photo ID (must include the voter’s name, photograph and expiration date)

                  The following photo IDs are acceptable for voting purposes, and can be unexpired or expired after the date of the most recently general election (currently the November 6, 2020 election): 

                  • A Wisconsin DOT-issued driver license, even if revoked or suspended 

                  • A Wisconsin DOT-issued identification card 

                  • Military ID card issued by a U.S. uniformed service (including retired military)

                  • A U.S. passport book or card

                  The following photo IDs are also acceptable for voting purposes, but must be unexpired:  

                  • A certificate of naturalization that was issued not earlier than two years before the date of an election at which it is presented

                  • A driver license receipt issued by Wisconsin DOT (valid for 45 days)

                  • An identification card receipt issued by Wisconsin DOT (valid for 45 days)

                  • IDPP (valid for 60 days)

                  • A veteran’s photo ID issued by the Veterans Health Administration of the federal Department of Veterans Affairs.

                  The following types of documents may be expired:

                  • A photo identification card issued by a Wisconsin accredited university, college or Tech College that contains the following:

                    • Date of issuance

                    • Signature of Student

                    • Expiration date no later than two years after date of issuance

                    • If expired, the university or college ID must be accompanied by a separate document that proves enrollment

                    The following photo IDs are also acceptable for voting purposes, regardless of the 
                    expiration date:    

                  • A Tribal ID


                  4.    Election Inspector asks the voter to sign one copy of the poll book next to their name.

                  Tip:  The voter can sign using their “mark,” an “X” or a signature stamp.  
                  Tip:  Election Inspectors can offer the signature guide to assist voters with signing in the correct spot in the poll book.  

                  • If a voter refuses to sign the poll book and does not claim to be unable to do so, the voter does not receive a ballot.

                  • If the voter signs the poll book using anything other than their or mark, the voter does not receive a ballot.

                  • If a voter is unable to sign the poll list, inspectors mark “Exempt” in the signature block.

                  • If another person signed the voter’s registration form because the voter was unable to sign due to disability, the inspector writes the word “Exempt” on the signature line.

                  • If both inspectors do not waive the signature requirement, the voter shall be allowed to cast a challenged ballot and the inspectors should document the situation on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                  • If another voter has mistakenly signed the poll list next to the voter’s name, the inspectors should document the discrepancy on the Inspectors’ Statement.  

                  5.    The voter is issued a voter number, which is written down on the poll book next to the voter’s name.
                  Tip:  Different municipalities may use different methods of issuing voter numbers,  such as a voter slip, voter ticket, or color coded based on ballot type.  
                  Tip:  Periodically reconcile poll lists throughout the day

                  • Check voter numbers between poll books to ensure they match    

                  • Compare notations beside voter name to determine if they match

                  • Circle the last voter number on both poll lists in red

                  6.    The voter is issued a ballot and directed to the voting area.

                  Tip:  Your polling place may be set up with a separate ballot table.

                  Tip:  Election inspectors should let voters know that the accessible voting equipment is available for all voters.  

                  Frequently Asked Questions
                  What if a voter does not want to state their name and address?

                  • If a voter is unwilling to state their name and address and does not indicate they are unable to do so, they are not issued a ballot. 

                  Can anyone assist a voter in marking their ballot or signing their name?

                  • Anyone other than the voter’s employer or representative of the voter’s labor union may assist a voter marking their ballot or signing their name, including a poll worker. 

                  Does the address on the photo ID have to be current?

                  • No, the address on the voter’s photo ID does not have to be current to be acceptable. 

                  Can a voter who returned an absentee ballot vote a new ballot at the polls?

                  • No, a voter who has returned an absentee ballot cannot vote a new ballot at the polls on Election Day.  

                  Do both election inspectors managing the poll books need to view the voter’s photo ID?

                  • Yes, both election inspectors must view the voter’s photo ID and agree that the photo reasonable resembles the voter, the voter’s name conforms with the name on the poll list and the photo ID meets expiration date standards.

                  Does the voter’s signature in the poll book have to be legible?

                  • No, the name does not have to be legible and does not have to be compared to the voter’s signature on any other document.  

                  What if the voter failed to sign the poll book?

                  • The poll worker should note it on the Inspectors’ Statement, but it does not negate or otherwise affect the voter’s ballot.  

                  In lieu of the poll workers processing absentee ballots at each polling place on election day, a municipality may opt to canvass all the absentee ballots at a central location.  At the Central Count location, the Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers process and count the ballots.  Making the switch to the Central Count Absentee process is a substantial procedural change and requires planning and detailed processes and a commitment to making it work.

                  Clerk’s Duties 

                  • Shall give at least 48 hours-notice of the meeting of the Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers under s.7.52, Wis. Stats.  

                  • Notice shall be posted at the town hall and on the municipal website and will include where absentee ballot canvassing is to take place.  Additionally, the notice will be provided to any media that has requested municipal meeting notices in accordance with Wisconsin Statute 19.84(1)(b) and municipal policy. 

                  • Will appoint the Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers in accordance with Wisconsin Statute 7.53(2m)(b). 

                  • The Clerk will assign additional election workers to work under the supervision of the Absentee Board of Canvass in accordance with Wisconsin Statute 7.52(1)(b). 

                  • Will ensure that all members of the Board of Absentee Canvassers take an oath of office prior to performing their duties. 

                  • Sends to each polling place a log of all absentee ballots for each Ward within that polling place.   

                  • Brings absentee ballots to Absentee Ballot Central County location.   

                  • Posts on municipal website and posts in office the number of absentee ballots issued, and the number returned prior to 8:00 p.m. on Election Day.   

                  • Issues supplies (Appendix I) to the Absentee Board of Canvass necessary to complete the canvass of absentee ballots. 

                  Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers’ Duties 

                  • Convene the Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. on Election Day to canvass absentee ballots in accordance with Wisconsin Statute 7.52(1)(a).   

                  • Canvass all absentee ballots received before 8 p.m. in accordance with Wisconsin State Statutes as explained in the Election Day Manual.

                  • Complete a log of all activity that occurred during the Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers Meeting.

                  Operating Procedures

                  Set-Up

                  1. Verify the tamper-evident seal number on the door to each tabulator memory device matches with the number provided by the municipal clerk on the EL-104 Inspector’s Statement

                  2. Turn-on/start tabulator(s) and wait for zero tapes to print

                  3. Verify that all Wards display 0 totals and sign the bottom of the tapes.

                  4. Announce that the Central Count Absentee Ballot Processing is open for the specified election and record the time of the opening on the Incident Log that will be attached to the EL-104 Inspector’s Statement

                  Processing of Absentee Ballots

                  1. Record the seal number on the first container of absentee ballots on the Incident Log and open the container.

                  2. Ballots are sorted by ward and alphabetized within each ward.  Pair ballots from each ward with the absentee ballot log associated with that ward for processing.  Processing can be done one ward at a time or with multiple wards at the same time with teams of two election inspectors assigned to each ward.  

                  3. Pull out an absentee ballot and verify that the name is on the absentee ballot log.

                  4. Double check the certificate envelope for the voter signature, witness signature and complete address and verify that envelope does not appear to have been tampered with.  

                  5. Read aloud the voter’s name and address.

                  6. Using the tally number sheet assign the voter a number and write that number in the following two required places: 

                    1. On the absentee ballot log

                    2. On the ballot

                    3. Clerks who use central count have also recommended the voter number be added to the absentee certificate envelope.  This extra documentation may be helpful for canvass or for potential referrals to the District Attorney if an irregularity is discovered.  

                  7. Open the absentee carrier envelope, remove the ballot and verify there is only one ballot, briefly inspect it for any tears or stray marks and verify it contains the municipal clerk’s initials and is for the proper ward.

                  8. The ballot is then ready for tabulation.   For larger municipalities, and during high turnout elections, absentee ballot canvassers may find it beneficial for their ballots to be processed in batches of a pre-determined number of ballots, such as batches of 10 ballots at a time.  Processing ballots in this way can help alleviate congestion at the tabulator and any confusion that may arise from a large number of ballots waiting to be processed.

                  9. Place the carrier envelope in the Used Certificate Envelopes for Absentee Electors envelope. 

                  10. If there are any errors with the tabulator reading the ballot a message will appear on the screen and follow the instructions to remedy the issue.  

                  11. If there is an error and voter intent cannot be determined, you may use the override function to count all readable votes on the ballot.  

                  12. At the conclusion of processing ballots for that ward, carefully sort through the ballots to search for any eligible write-in votes.  Depending on the type of equipment used, your tabulator may sort ballots containing write-in votes separately when they are inserted into the machine.  All ballots must be reviewed to identify write-in votes where the oval/arrow was not filled in.

                  13. Complete the write-in tally sheet for that ward with the eligible write-ins and if there are none, write “none” on the tally sheet provided.  Sign the write-in tally sheet.

                  14. Bundle all of the ballots with rubber bands and place them into the respective ballot bag.  It may be appropriate to wait to seal ballot bags until the end of the night as ballots may continue to arrive at central count during the day for processing. 

                  15. Place the absentee log and related forms off to the side and continue with the next Ward’s absentee ballots until you are through processing all available ballots.

                  Processing of Absentee Ballots – Special Situations

                  Ballot Missing Municipal Clerk’s Initials

                  • Make a note of this in the Incident Log and then process the ballot as normal.

                  Remade Ballots
                  Ballots may need to be remade for any of the following reasons:

                  • The ballot is torn or not readable by the voting equipment.
                  • The ballot  was emailed to an overseas voter, has been returned, and needs to be remade onto an official paper ballot.
                  • The voting equipment is unable to read the ballot, but voter intent can be determined.
                  • The voter received the incorrect ballot for their ward.

                  Steps for Remaking a Ballot:

                  1. Two absentee ballot canvassers must participate in remaking a ballot.  If available, use ballot remaking teams that consist of one election inspector from each of the two political parties allowed to nominate election inspectors.  

                  2. Retrieve a new ballot for that ward from the municipal clerk’s office.

                  3. Assign the remade ballot a number (sequential for each ward beginning with 1) and note this on the new ballot and the original voted ballot in the space provided.

                  4. Document the ‘Remade Ballot #__’ on the Incident Log.  For larger municipalities and high turnout elections, it may be beneficial for absentee ballot canvassers to  separate incident logs for all remade ballots and another for all rejected ballots.  These can be combined after processing is done to create one complete Incident Log.

                  5. Carefully copy votes from original ballot to the new ballot and have your partner verify accuracy and consistency.

                  6. Place the original “damage/unreadable” ballot in the remade ballot envelope.

                  7. Send the remade ballot through the voting equipment.

                  Rejected Ballots
                  Absentee ballots with an incomplete certification (missing voter or witness signature or missing witness address) should be rejected after 8:00 p.m., which is the deadline for voters to rectify their incomplete certification.

                  • Note the number of rejected absentee ballots on incident log.
                  • All rejected absentee ballots may be placed in one carrier envelope after 8:00 p.m.

                  Voter Returns a Ballot to the Central Count Location
                  If a voter brings their voted, sealed, absentee ballot to a polling place other than the location designated for central count, instruct them to go central count location.  Do not accept any ballots after 8:00 p.m.
                  Closing Procedures

                  1. Closing the polls on the voting equipment machines may not occur until after 8:00 p.m.

                  2. Ensure all ballots have been processed and accounted for. 

                  3. Announce the closing of the Absentee Ballot Canvass out loud. 

                  4. Verify the seal number on the voting equipment memory device access panel matches with the seal number verified at the convening of the absentee ballot canvass and initial on the master Inspector’s Statement.  If there is a discrepancy in seal numbers, contact the municipal clerk immediately.

                  5. Remove the seal, document this on the master Incident Log, and open the door to the memory device.

                  6. Push the CLOSE POLLS button or your equipment’s equivalent.

                  7. A minimum of two results tapes will print.  

                  8. Verify totals on the results tape with each Ward’s absentee ballot log and record the total number of absentee ballots processed on the Inspector’s statement.  If any discrepancies are noticed, they should attempt to be resolved at this time.

                    1. Once results have been verified and totals have been recorded sign the following:

                      1. Results Tapes 

                      2. Used Certificate Envelope for Absentee Electors envelope(s) OR bag(s) (w/certification sheet attached) 

                      3. Rejected Ballot Envelope(s)

                      4. Remade Ballot Envelope(s)

                      5. Ballot Container(s) Certificate

                  9. Modem Results to the county (where applicable and only after being instructed to do so by the municipal clerk).  

                  10. Shut down the voting equipment, remove the memory device(s) and place them in the respective bags for secure storage and transport.  

                  11. Complete the card inside the orange bag and record the seal number to be used to seal the bag.

                  12. Seal the orange bag including all memory devices from all machines.

                  13. Deliver all materials to the municipal clerk’s office.

                  APPENDIX I - SUPPLIES 

                  The following supplies will be provided for each election to the Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers: 

                  • Two (2) duplicate copies for each Ward of the absentee log printed from the WisVote System 

                  • Sufficient large ballot envelopes/bags/containers prepared with Chain of Custody and Certificate signed by the Board   

                  • Sufficient Inspectors’ Statements (EL-104) (a single Inspectors’ Statement must be maintained for each ward)   

                  • Sufficient Incident Logs (to be attached to EL-104 forms)

                  • Sufficient large envelopes for Used Certificate Envelopes (EL-103)   

                  • Sufficient large envelopes for Rejected Absentee Ballot Envelopes (EL-102)   

                  • Sufficient large envelopes labeled for Remade/Reconstructed ballots

                  • Sufficient write-in tally forms (a single tally sheet must be maintained for each ward)   

                  • Voter number sheets 

                  • Election Day Manual for reference   

                  • Red pens for marking absentee ballot logs   

                  • Ballots for remaking voted ballots if necessary    

                  • Black pens for marking ballots

                  • Challenge documentation for reference   

                  Completing and Delivering Forms  

                  Municipalities utilizing an optical scan voting system shall use two machine printouts as tally sheets.  However, write-in votes must be recorded on duplicate original Write-in forms (EL-105), which are signed by the Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers.  The ballots and materials shall be delivered to the municipal clerk who, in turn, delivers them to the County Clerk with all other materials and ballots, and after completing, recording and securing the required forms.  As at the polls, all ballots must be secured in a ballot bag with the signatures of the Municipal Board of Absentee Ballot Canvassers.   
                   

                  Confidential Electors
                  Overview

                  Electors who are victims of domestic abuse, sexual assault or stalking have the option to be listed confidentially on poll lists.  If your municipality has confidential electors, they will be indicated in the “Confidential” section of the pre-printed poll list.  This section appears at the back of the poll list.  This section of the poll list is NOT open to public inspection.

                  A confidential elector may present their Identification Card for Protected Individual or announce their name and confidential elector identification number rather than announce their name and address.  Confidential electors must still sign the poll list if they vote at the polls on Election Day.

                  Procedure

                  1. The voter presents their voter identification card (EL-148) that will contain a unique identification serial number assigned to them by the municipal clerk or announce their name and confidential elector identification number. Tip:  A confidential voter does not have to provide photo ID to receive a ballot.

                  2. The voter signs the poll list.

                  3. The voter is assigned a regular voter number.

                  4. The voter is issued a ballot and directed to the voting area.

                  5. The address of the protected individual is not listed on the confidential portion of the poll list.

                  Tip:  The confidential portion of the poll list is NOT open to public inspection.  Election officials may, upon request, disclose the existence of the list, the number of electors whose names appear on the list, and the number of those electors who have voted at any point in the proceedings.

                  Frequently Asked Questions

                  Does a confidential voter at the polling place on Election Day have to sign the poll list?

                  • Yes, a confidential voter must sign the poll list unless unable to do so and marked exempt by the poll workers.  

                  Does a confidential voter have to provide photo ID to receive a ballot?

                  • No, a confidential voter does not have to provide photo ID.  

                  Observers

                  Overview

                  Anyone, other than a candidate on the ballot for the election, has the right to be present to observe the conduct of the election.  There is no requirement for observers to obtain a permit or notify the clerk in advance of Election Day.  All observers will be accorded the same respect regardless of their party affiliation or non-affiliation.

                  The Wisconsin Elections Commission has established a set of rules for observers at the polling place or other locations where votes are being cast, counted, canvassed or recounted.  

                  Procedure 

                  Designate an observer area(s) which allows observers to hear instructions and to observe all public aspects of the process without disrupting the activities.

                  • Check-In Area:  There must be an observer area between three and eight feet of the table at which electors state their name and address to receive a voter number.

                  • Voter Registration Area:  There must be an observer area between three and eight feet of the voter registration table.

                  Tip:  Mark off the observer area with tape or signage before the polls open or any observers arrive.  

                  If observers are unable to hear the election inspectors and/or voters, they may ask for instructions or information to be repeated.  

                  Observers should direct questions/concerns to the chief inspector or designee.

                  The number of observes representing the same organization or candidate may be limited if space is limited.

                  Observers should check in and follow direction from the election official in charge of the polling place or other location. 

                  Location

                  Election Official

                  Polling Place

                  Chief Inspector or their designee

                  Central Count

                  Municipal Clerk or their designee

                  Observers must fill out the Election Observer Log (EL-109) with their name, street address and municipality, and the name of the organization or candidate the observer represents, if any.  

                  An observer must present photo identification to an election inspector.  Any type of photo identification is acceptable if it contains a photo of the observer and the observer’s name. An election official will verify by marking on the EL-109 that the observer’s name listed on the EL-109 matches the photo identification.  
                  Tip:  If the observer does not want to provide photo identification or the information on the photo identification does not match the information on the observer log, the individual will not be permitted to serve as an observer.

                  Tip:  The EL-109 may not be viewed by members of the public or other observers on Election Day.  A copy may be provided after Election Day by the municipal clerk. A copy of the form should be attached to the Inspector’s Statement (EL-104).

                  An observer must wear a name tag or badge which reads “Election Observer.”    
                  Tip: The name of the observer need not appear on the Election Observer tag or badge.

                  A summary of the observer rules must be provided to each observer.  The Wisconsin Election Observers Rules-at-a-Glance brochure may be used to meet this requirement and is available on the agency website.

                  Use of Cell Phones/Photography. Observers may silently use cell phones in the polling area.  Observers may not use cell phones to take or make voice calls (ringer should be silenced).  Observers may not take photographs or videos in the polling place, outside of the exception listed below.  The chief inspector may prohibit an observer from using a cell phone if it is deemed disruptive.   

                  Electioneering and Disruptive Behavior.  Observers are prohibited from electioneering or interfering with the orderly conduct of the election and/or election administration event.  
                  Any observer who engages in loud, boisterous, or otherwise disruptive behavior with other observes or voters that the election official believes threatens the orderly conduct of the activity or interferes with voting may receive a warning from the election official. 

                  • If a warning has been issued, and the offending observer continues the disorderly behavior, the chief inspector should order the offending observer to depart the location.  If the offending observer declines or otherwise fails to comply with the chief inspector’s order to depart, the chief inspector should summon local law enforcement to remove the offending observer.

                  • In the event that the chief inspector orders an observer to leave a location, the chief inspector is required to provide a written order to the observer (EL-110) which includes the reason for the order and the signatures of the chief inspector as well as another election inspector election official representing the opposite political party, if available.  The chief inspector has sole authority to order the removal of an observer, but another election inspector may note their concurrence or disagreement with the decision on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                  • When an EL-110 is completed, the municipal clerk or board of election commissioners is required to notify the WEC of the incident within seven days.  This notification should include a copy of the EL-110, if available, and the portion of the Inspectors’ Statement which documents the incident.

                  Viewing Documents.  Observers may examine the poll list so long as they do not interfere with election official responsibilities.

                  • The election official determines whether it is an appropriate time to allow an observer to examine or photograph the poll list.

                  Tip:  If voters are standing in line to have their names recorded and to receive a ballot, it is not an appropriate time to allow observers to view the poll lists.

                  • The poll list must always remain under the control of the election officials.

                  • The poll list may not be handed to the observers.

                  • Observers are prohibited from viewing the confidential portion of the poll list.

                  • Observers may take photographs of the poll list if approved by the chief inspector.  Observers are not permitted to make a photocopy of or take photographs or video of proof of residence documents and voted ballots.

                  • Observers are not permitted to handle an original version of any official election document, including voter registration forms and/or proof of residence documents while voters are registering.

                  Additional Prohibited Activities.  Observers may not conduct any of the following disorderly activities while monitoring the conduct of the election and/or election administration event.

                  • Wear clothing or buttons related to candidates, parties, or referenda that are intended to influence voting at the election.

                  • Interact with voters, except when asked by an elector to provide assistance in marking their ballot.

                  • Watch voters mark their ballots.

                  • Have conversations about candidates, parties or ballot questions.

                  Frequently Asked Questions

                  Can an observer answer a question from a voter?

                  • Yes, if a voter asks the observer a direct question.  Depending on the question, the observer and voter may need to take the discussion away from the polling area.  

                  What if there is no space for an observer area at the polling place?

                  • The clerk should make every attempt to designate an observer area, even if the clerk has to limit the number of observers in the area at any one time.  If they are unable to designate an observer area, the clerk should report this information to the WEC.  

                  Curbside Voting
                  Overview

                  A voter who, as a result of disability, is unable to enter the polling place may elect to receive a ballot at the entrance of the polling place. Wis. Stat. § 6.82(1).  The voter may receive assistance in marking the ballot, if required, from an election inspector, or from any other person of the voter’s choice (except the voter’s employer or an agent of the elector’s labor union).  An unregistered voter may also register to vote curbside.

                  Procedure

                  1. The election inspectors announce in the polling place that an elector has requested a curbside ballot, and the inspectors are going to the vehicle to view the voter’s proof of identification. Tip: If having two election inspectors leave the polling area would result in fewer than three election inspectors in the polling area, voting must stop until the election inspectors return.

                  2. Two election inspectors go to the vehicle and speak to the voter. The election inspectors return to the polling area and announce that they are issuing a ballot to the voter.

                    1. The inspectors should ask the voter if they are unable to enter the polling place.  If the voter indicates he or she is able to enter the polling place, curbside voting may not be used. Tip:  A voter’s dog in the car, for example, is not an acceptable reason to cast a curbside vote.  

                    2. The inspectors should ask the voter to present acceptable proof of identification. Tip:  The inspectors determine if the voter may vote a regular ballot or a provisional ballot.

                  3. The voter is not required to sign the poll list.  A notation “Ballot received at poll entrance

                    1. "Exempt” is made in the signature line of the voter on the poll list.

                  4. Two inspectors initial the ballot.  A voter number or provisional voter number is issued to the voter and recorded in the voter lists.  

                  5. Two inspectors deliver the ballot to the curbside voter in a security sleeve.  

                  6. The curbside voter marks the ballot or has an assistor mark the ballot for the voter.  (If assistor, see “Assisting Electors” in the Election Day Manual).  

                  7. The inspectors return to the voting area and announce: “I have a ballot offered by (voter’s name), a voter who, as the result of a disability, is unable to enter the polling place without assistance.  Does anyone object to the reception of this ballot?” Tip:  If an objection is made, follow the challenge procedures detailed below under “Challenging Electors” in the Election Day Manual.

                  8. If no objection is made or after any challenge is resolved, the ballot is deposited in the appropriate ballot box or tabulating equipment.

                  9. This incident should be recorded on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                  Frequently Asked Questions

                  Can a voter with a dog in their car qualify to vote curbside?  

                  • No, only a voter who, as a result of a disability, is unable to enter the polling place may request to vote curbside.  

                  Can a voter also register to vote curbside?

                  • Yes, a voter may also register to vote curbside.  

                  What if the number of election workers in the polling area falls below three during the administration of a curbside vote?

                  • If the number of election inspectors falls below the minimum of three in the polling area, all voting must stop until the minimum of three election inspectors is restored.   

                   
                  Do the election inspectors have to immediately administer a curbside vote when a voter requesting one arrives at the polling place?

                  • Election Inspectors do not have to immediately administer a curbside ballot if voting activity in the polling place is very high, but should make every effort to do so as quickly as possible. 

                  Can a voter in the wrong polling place vote curbside?

                  • No, a voter can only vote curbside at their correct polling place.  

                  Challenging Electors

                  Overview

                  When there is reason to believe that an elector does not meet the qualifications to vote or has not adhered to any voting requirement, the elector may be challenged.  Only election inspectors may challenge an elector for failing to adhere to a voting requirement.

                  • Challenges that may be brought by any qualified elector of the state, including election inspectors, are as follows:

                    • Citizenship:  voter is not a U.S. Citizen

                    • Age: voter is not at least 18 years-of-age on or before Election Day

                    • Residency:  voter has not resided in the municipality for at least 28 days before the election

                    • Felony Status:  voter has not completed the terms of their sentence

                    • Competency to Vote: voter has been adjudicated incompetent to vote

                    • Bet or Wager:  voter has placed a bet or wager on the election

                    • Voted Previously at the Same Election: voter has already cast a ballot in the election

                  Tip: Any challenge based upon an individual’s appearance, speech or inability to speak English is unacceptable. 

                  Tip: While the challenge process is a public process, it is recommended that the challenge process be conducted away from the heavy traffic areas. 

                  • Challenges that may only be brought by an election inspector include:

                    • Physical Disability:  voter’s claim of a physical disability does not prevent signing of poll list.

                    • Photo ID:  photograph on the proof of identification does not reasonably resemble the elector, or the name on the poll list does not conform to the name on the proof of identification.

                    • Clerk instruction:  municipal clerk has instructed the election inspectors to challenge the ballot because the clerk does not believe the person requesting a replacement ballot is the original voter.

                    • Voting Requirements: any other failure to adhere to voting requirements.

                  Tip: Inspectors should use discretion when challenging a voter for these reasons.       

                  • If an election inspector is offering the challenge, another election inspector should administer the process.

                  • All challenges must be made for reasonable cause as outlined on the Challenge Documentation of the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104c).  

                  • The election inspectors should use discretion when administering a challenge and attempt to document the challenge in a calm and respectful manner.

                  • All challenges are recorded using the Challenge Documentation section (EL-104c) of the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).  The form lists the procedures to follow and questions used to establish the challenge.

                  Procedure

                  All challenges are recorded using the Challenge Documentation form (EL-104c) and attach it to the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).  This form details the specific procedure to follow and questions used to establish and administer the challenge.  The challenge process will be abbreviated when challenging an absentee ballot, because the voter is not present at the polls.   

                  1. The challenging elector is placed under oath and asked to make a sworn statement giving the reason for the challenge.

                    1. The challenging elector is then questioned by the election inspector using the questions on the Challenge Documentation form (EL-104c) to provide reasonable support for the challenge.

                    2. The Chief Inspector makes the final determination of the validity of the challenge and if it is for a reasonable cause.  

                  2. After the challenge has been made and supported under oath, the challenged elector is placed under oath and asked to make a sworn statement in response to the challenge.  

                    1. Indicate “Sworn” on the poll list.

                    2. If the challenged elector refuses to make a statement under oath, the elector shall not be given a ballot or permitted to vote.

                  3. If the challenged elector has responded to the challenge, the challenging elector is given the opportunity to withdraw their challenge.  

                    1. If the challenge is withdrawn, a ballot is issued with no special marks, a notation is made in the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104), and no mark is made on the poll lists.

                  4. If the challenge is not withdrawn, the election inspector administers the “Oath of Eligibility” to the challenged elector.

                    1. Once the oath has been made by the elector, a ballot is issued with the voter number and “Section 6.95” marked on the back of the ballot.

                    2. Once the challenged elector has marked the ballot, it is placed by the elector into the ballot box.

                    3. The entire Challenge Documentation (EL-104c) is completed and attached to the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                    4. A notation “Challenged” and the reason for the challenge is made on the poll lists and the appropriate sections of the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104) are completed by the election inspector.

                  Frequently Asked Questions

                  When is a challenge unacceptable?  

                  • Any challenge based on an individual’s ethnicity, accent or inability to speak English is unacceptable.  A notation of the alleged grounds should be made on the Challenge Documentation form (EL-104c).  The challenge should be dismissed and an unmarked ballot issued to the voter.  

                  Can an election inspector challenge a voter if they believe the photograph on the voter’s photo ID does not reasonably resemble the voter or the name does not conform to the name on the poll list?

                  • Yes, both are challenges that may be brought by an election inspector.  


                  Provisional Voting

                  Overview

                  Wisconsin voters who are unable or unwilling to provide their Wisconsin Driver License or state-issued ID card number or are unable or unwilling to provide photo ID, must be offered the option of casting a provisional ballot.
                  In Wisconsin, provisional voting is ONLY used in two situations:

                  1. If an individual who attempts to register to vote at the polling place on Election Day has been issued an unexpired Wisconsin Driver License or Wisconsin DOT-issued State Identification Card, but is unwilling or unable to provide the license or state identification card number, the individual may vote provisionally. Tip:  Even if driving privileges were revoked

                    1. The number of a Wisconsin driver license or state identification card that has expired or been cancelled, is not required.

                    2. Wisconsin DOT/DMV maintains a Help Desk for individuals to call if they need to look up their driver license or state identification card number.  The phone number is: (608) 266-1069, option 1.

                    3. Individuals who have an unexpired Wisconsin driver license or valid Wisconsin state identification card may NOT use the last four digits of their Social Security number to register.

                  2. If an individual is unable or unwilling to provide an acceptable form of proof of identification, he or she may vote provisionally.

                    1. If the election inspectors do not believe that the name of the elector conforms to the name shown on the proof of identification, or if the elector does not reasonably resemble the photograph on the proof of identification, the elector’s ballot should be challenged (see the “Challenging Electors” section in the Election Day Manual).

                  Procedure
                  Once it is determined a voter will vote provisionally, the following procedures are required:

                  1. Every provisional voter must complete a Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123) in the presence of an election official by providing:  

                    1. Full name

                    2. Complete address, including municipality and county

                    3. Date of birth

                    4. Indication of U.S. Citizenship

                    5. Date of election

                    6. Signature and date

                  2. The election inspector completes the certificate envelope by:

                    1. Signing and dating the certificate envelope.

                    2. Indicating the type of required information (either “Driver License or State Identification Card Number” or “Proof of Identification” ) by checking the appropriate box or boxes on the certificate envelope.

                  3. The election inspector issues a provisional voter number (PV#), which is recorded on the poll list.  A voter number is NOT issued to the elector at this time and the elector does NOT sign the poll list.

                    1. This number is issued sequentially, starting with “1.”

                    2. The PV# is also recorded in six places:

                      1. The back of the ballot

                      2. On the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104)

                      3. On the Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123)

                      4. On the Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r)

                      5. On the poll list or supplemental poll list

                      6. On the Provisional Voting Information sheet for the elector

                  4. The elector votes the ballot, seals the voted ballot in the Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123), and returns the sealed envelope to the election inspector.

                  5. The sealed certificate envelope (EL-123) is placed inside the Inspectors’ Certificate for Provisional Ballots Envelope (EL-108).

                    1. The election inspectors record the name of the elector, the PV#, and the reason for the provisional ballot on the Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r) and on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                    2. The Inspectors’ Certificate of Provisional Ballots Envelope (EL-108) must be kept secure throughout Election Day.

                    3. When the polling place closes, the Inspectors’ Certificate of Provisional Ballots Envelope (EL-108) must be secured in a separate ballot bag with a tamper-evident serialized numbered seal.  The serial number shall be recorded on the signed ballot container certification attached to the bag and on the Inspectors’ Statement.  The bag should be marked “Provisional Ballots.”

                  6. Election inspectors must provide the elector with the Provisional Voting Information Sheet and should check the applicable reason that the provisional ballot was issued.

                  7. An elector who was issued a provisional ballot may return to the polling place before 8 p.m. to provide the missing documentation to the election inspectors.  Election inspectors shall review the provided documentation to determine if it is satisfactory.

                    1. If the provided documentation is not valid, the election inspectors shall inform the elector and record the incident on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104) including the type of document presented and why it was not acceptable.

                    2. If the provided documentation is valid:

                      1. The elector must sign the poll or supplemental list.

                      2. Note on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104) that the elector provided the required documentation.

                      3. Initial and date the Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r) to indicate that the elector provided the required documentation.

                    3. Election inspectors should offer the elector the option of spoiling the provisional ballot and voting a new ballot.

                  If the elector chooses to spoil the provisional ballot:

                  1. The Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123) is removed from the Inspectors’ Certificate of Provisional Ballots (EL-108) envelope and given to the elector.

                  2. The elector should remove the provisional ballot and spoil it by making a small tear in the ballot rendering is unusable.  

                  3. Document the incident and spoiled ballot on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                  4. The elector signs the poll list.

                  5. The elector is issued a sequential voter number, which is recorded on the poll list and noted on the Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r) by marking “on poll list” in the column labeled “Voter Number Issued.”

                  6. The elector is given a new ballot.

                  If the elector chooses to cast the provisional ballot:

                  1. Note on the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104) and initial and date the Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r) that the elector provided the required documentation.

                  2. Remove the elector’s Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123) from the Inspectors’ Certificate of Provisional Ballots (EL-108) envelope.

                  3. Verify that the Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123) has not been opened or tampered with.

                    1. If the Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123) has been tampered with, the election inspectors shall spoil the provisional ballot and instruct the elector to cast a new ballot.

                  4. The elector signs the poll list.

                  5. The elector is issued a sequential voter number, which is recorded on the poll list and noted on the Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r) by marking “on poll list” in the column labeled “Voter Number Issued.”

                  6. Provide the elector with the Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123) and instruct him or her to remove the ballot and place it in the ballot box or voting equipment.

                  7. Collect the used Provisional Ballot Certificate Envelope (EL-123) from the elector and place it back in the Inspectors’ Certification of Provisional Ballots (EL-108) envelope.

                  Processing

                  1. A Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r) must be completed by the election inspectors at the polling place listing all of the electors who cast a provisional ballot.  The clerk must review the form and send a copy to both the county clerk and their WisVote provider if different after the close of polls on Election Day.  The municipal clerk must keep a copy for their office.  A blank Provisional Ballot Reporting Form is available on the agency website.

                  2. The chief inspector should maintain communication with the municipal clerk regarding the number of provisional ballots issued on Election Day.

                  Frequently Asked Questions
                  Can a voter who is in the wrong polling place cast a provisional ballot?

                  • No, a voter in the wrong polling place may not cast a provisional ballot.

                  Can a voter who does not have proof of residence vote a provisional ballot?

                  • No, a voter without acceptable proof of residence may not vote a provisional ballot. 

                  Can election inspectors ask the voter to return with the needed documents on Election Day instead of issuing a provisional ballot?  

                  • They can suggest it, but a voter who casts a provisional ballot must be informed they have until 4:00 p.m. the Friday after the election to provide the municipal clerks with the necessary documentation.  

                  Does a voter who casts a provisional ballot sign the poll list?

                  • No, unless the voter returns to the polling place by 8:00 p.m. on Election Night with the required documentation.

                  This is crucial information for new election workers and a good review for more seasoned ones. While the voters may be done casting their ballots, the closing of polls is a very important and busy part of Election Day.  It is vital to pay close attention to the various processes that will allow you to get the final vote totals, report out results, and pack up the polling place.

                  Polls close at 8:00 p.m.

                  • Use the official clock noted in the Inspectors’ Statement to open the polls at 7:00 a.m. to determine when it is 8:00 p.m. 

                  • Dispatch an end of line officer to identify the last person who is eligible to vote.  The end of line officer will stand behind the last person in line at 8:00 p.m. to indicate who met the 8:00 p.m. closing deadline.

                  • Anyone who is in line before the end of line officer is eligible to cast a ballot. Even if someone needs to register at the polls and is last in line before 8:00 p.m., they have the right to register and vote.

                  • Publicly announce that the polls have closed.

                  • Keep the polling place open:  

                    • Do not lock the doors!

                    • The closing of the polls is considered an open meeting and anyone can observe the process, including candidates on the ballot.

                  Double check that all ballots have been counted by the tabulators/are in the ballot box

                  • Make sure to check that any absentee materials do not contain ballots that haven’t been tabulated.

                  • Review any ballots that needed to be remade to ensure that they have been documented properly and the remade ballots have been counted.

                  • Double check the emergency or auxiliary bin for any ballots that may have been deposited there.

                  • Reconcile the Pollbook

                  • The number of voters from the day should equal the number of ballots recorded by the tabulator or in the ballot box. Compare the two different pollbooks to ensure that they both contain identical information.

                  • We suggest you compare voter numbers throughout the day to make sure you have identical pollbooks and can quickly identify if you are off.

                    • If you are off, note this in the Inspectors’ Statement to narrow the timeframe and potentially explain why you might have more ballots than recorded voters at the end of the day.

                  • Circle the last voter number in red to quickly identify the final total of voters from Election Day. 

                  Results

                  • Tabulator

                    • Ensure that the tamper-evident seal on the tabulator has not been broken and contains the same serial number that was recorded in the Inspectors’ Statement at the beginning of the day

                      • If it is not, contact your municipal clerk

                    • Close the polls on the machine 

                    • Make sure that the zero tape and results tape are still attached.

                  • Ballot Box

                    • Ensure that the box has been locked all day, and then use the key to open the box and collect the ballots to be tallied.

                  • Transmit Results

                    • Once results have been tabulated/tallied, announce the results and transmit them to the county

                    • If your municipality calls in results to the county, have all necessary reporting documents completed before calling the clerk’s office.  The county clerk will be receiving many calls from other polling locations, and you will need to efficiently and accurately report your results.

                  • Write-ins

                    • Review the ballots for write-in votes and determine which write-in ballots can be counted

                      • Always count votes for registered write-in candidates

                      • Count votes for unregistered write-in candidates only if:

                  • There are fewer ballot candidates for a given office than there are seats to fill

                  • In a partisan primary – There are no ballot candidates for a given office in a given party

                    • Count votes for a unregistered write-in candidates if a ballot candidate for that office is deceased

                  • Comparing Total Number of Voters to Number of Ballots

                    • In order to confirm that there are an equal number of voters and ballots cast, you will have to compare the last voter number given out on Election Day to the number of ballots cast on the tabulator or in the ballot box.

                    • If you have more voters than ballots:

                      • This could because someone decided not to vote and walked off with their ballot.  Look around the polling place to ensure there are no ballots that need to be cast/were not counted.

                    • If you have more ballots than voters:

                      • Check that everyone received a voter number and that there are no skipped voters or duplicate voter numbers

                      • Check your EDRs to ensure they were given a voter number

                      • Determine if there was potentially a ballot jam that was recorded more than once

                    • If your numbers are still off and you cannot determine why, you may need to perform a drawdown.  Contact your municipal clerk to determine if you need to perform a drawdown and for more information.

                  Documents

                  • Inspectors’ Statement – This document explains the activities on Election Day to someone who wasn’t at the polling place.  The Inspectors’ Statement can be used later should there be a recount or confusion at another canvass. Make sure to note:

                    • Total number of voters

                    • Total number of EDRs

                    • Number of absentee voters

                    • Number of provisional ballots

                    • Total number of ballots cast

                    • Number of ballots in excess of total number of voters

                    • Number of hand-count paper ballots

                    • Number of optical scan ballots

                    • Number of ballots voted on the DRE

                    • Any issues or situations that occurred on Election Day

                    • Attach the observer log, all challenge documentation forms, and any Orders to Leave to the Inspectors’ Statement

                  • Tally sheets and machine tapes – review to verify they contain the identical and accurate information.

                  • Ballots – when preparing ballots to be taken to the county clerk, make sure to separate any regular ballots from those that have been identified as damaged, defective, overvoted, objected to or set aside.  These ballots should be bundled separately and plated in the original ballot bag.

                    • Place all voted ballots along with the Original Ballots envelope in the ballot bag.

                      • If you have political appointees serving as election inspectors, at least one elector inspector from each party must participate in the securing of the ballots.

                      • Secure the bag with a temper-evident seal so no ballot can be removed or inserted without breaking the seal.

                      • Sign the Ballot Container Certificate 

                    • Rejected absentee ballots envelopes need to be secured in the brown carrier enveloped and signed by the chief inspector and two inspectors.

                    • All used absentee certificate envelopes should be placed in the white carrier envelope and signed by the chief inspector and two other election inspectors.

                    • If you have any provisional ballots, they need to be placed in the provisional ballot carrier envelope.

                      • The provisional ballot carrier envelope should be placed in a separate ballot bag and sealed with a tamper-evident seal.

                      • The Provisional Ballots Reporting Form should not be sealed in the ballot container.

                  • Make sure that all ballots and information are recorded in the Inspectors’ Statement.

                  Board of Canvassers

                  • If there is only one polling place in your municipality, you have no outstanding provisional ballots, and you have municipal offices or referenda on the ballot, the election inspectors will act as the municipal board of canvass and certify the municipal results.

                  • If you have multiple polling places in your municipality ¬¬or you have an outstanding provisional ballot, the clerk and two other qualified electors of the municipality will serve at the municipal board of canvassers and certify the results later in the week. 

                  Routing Materials

                  • All materials will be routed to the municipal clerk, who in turn will ensure the proper materials are giving to the proper clerk.

                  • Election inspectors should separate out materials so the municipal clerk can easily provide the school district clerks and county clerks the correct material after Election Day

                  Municipal Clerk – here are all the documents that need to be separated for the municipal clerk:

                  • Send all ballots (voted, unused, and provisional)

                  • Original tally sheets

                  • A copy of the voting equipment tape (if any)

                  • Original Inspectors’ Statement

                  • Statement of the Board of Canvassers (if required)

                  • One original poll list and one original supplemental poll list

                  Tip:  The poll list with the voters’ signatures will be given to the county clerk

                  • Absentee Ballot Log

                  • Provisional Ballot Reporting form

                  County Clerk – here are all the documents that need to be separated for the county clerk:

                  • The ballot bags or containers with all federal, state, county and technical college ballots.

                  • The brown carrier envelope (EL-102) containing rejected absentee ballots.

                  • The white carrier envelope (EL-103) containing used certificate envelopes from absentee voters.

                  • One copy of the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                  • One original Tally Sheet (EL-105) for presidential, congressional, state, legislative, judicial, and county offices and state, county and technical college referenda.

                  • A copy of the voting equipment results tape, if any.

                  • One original poll list including the supplemental poll list (EL-107s) that includes the electors’ signatures.

                  • A copy of the Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r).

                  School District Clerk – here are all the documents that need to be separated for the school district clerk:

                  • School district ballots (if hand-count paper ballots are used) sealed in a ballot bag.

                  • Original Tally Sheet (EL-105) listing school district results.

                  • A copy of the voting equipment results tape, if any.

                  • One copy of the Inspectors’ Statement (EL-104).

                  • A certified copy of the signed poll list (EL-107 & EL-107c).

                  • A copy of the Provisional Ballot Reporting Form (EL-123r).

                  Frequently Asked Questions
                  Who can observe the closing of the polls?

                  • Any member of the public is allowed to observe the closing of the polls, including any candidates who may have been on the ballot for that election.

                  Who is the Board of Canvassers?

                  • In municipalities with one polling place and one set of results, the election inspectors act as the municipal board of canvassers on election night when there are municipal offices or referenda on the ballot.

                  In our municipality, we have several polling places. When does the board of canvassers meet?

                  • In municipalities with more than one polling place where results must be combined, the municipal board of canvassers meets on the day after the election to certify the results of the municipal election and make the official determination of the winners. The board of canvassers consists of the municipal clerk and two other qualified electors of the municipality appointed by the municipal clerk.

                  This election includes school board members. Who certifies their results?

                  • School districts have their own board of canvassers to certify the school district results and make official determination of the winners. The board is made up of the school district clerk and two other qualified electors of the school district.

                  What do we do with unused ballots?

                  • Unused ballots are wrapped or bound separately and delivered to the municipal clerk. Make a note indicating that these ballots are unused.

                  Badger Books

                  In 2017, at the direction of the Commission, WEC staff developed an electronic poll book application for use in Wisconsin elections. Wisconsin statute requires authorization from the commission for the use of any electronic poll book in the state. To date, the Badger Book is the only electronic poll book authorized for use in Wisconsin and is the only e-poll book application with direct WisVote integration. Badger Books are not connected to the internet.

                  The Badger Book is only an electronic version of the paper poll book and as such, performs only those functions. It is used to check in voters, process Election Day Registrations (EDRs) per Wis. Stat. 6.79(2)(c), and record absentee participation.

                  After Election Day, a data file generated from the Badger Book is used to upload election participation and Election Day Registration information into WisVote so voters may see their participation more quickly in MyVote.

                  WisVote

                  WisVote is Wisconsin's online election management tool for managing the voter list, poll books, absentee requests and ballots, managing polling places, candidates, contests, and much more. Clerks and their staff use the application throughout the year to ensure information is up to date and their elections can run smoothly.