Items related to polling place accessibility.

Accessible Voting Training Tutorial Video: This is Where We Vote

Date

The Government Accountability Board partnered with the Wisconsin Disability Vote Coalition to create a training video for clerks and poll workers focused on accessible voting issues.  The video features voters with disabilities, advocates and local election officials discussing their experiences with polling place accessibility.  This 11-minute video can be used as part of a training program for poll workers in preparation for Election Day.

 Accessible Voting Training Video: This is Where We Vote - 2014

Accessible Voting Training Video: This is Where We Vote

 The Wisconsin Elections Commission, formerly the Government Accountability Board, partnered with the Wisconsin Disability Vote Coalition to create a training video for clerks and poll workers focused on accessible voting issues.  The video features voters with disabilities, advocates and local election officials discussing their experiences with polling place accessibility.  This 11 minute video can be used as part of a training program for poll workers in preparation for Election Day.

9. Doors that do not have lever door handles or an electronic feature such as an automatic opener, power-assist, or bell/buzzer.

Details

All polling place doors that a voter with a disability would have to open must have hardware, such as a lever or bar, which is usable with one hand without tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist (figure 1). A municipality can also choose to install an electronic accessible feature, such as an automatic opener or wireless doorbell, to ensure that voters can access the facility and voting area without assistance.

(figure 1)

7. Interior routes that had obstacles, were poorly lit, and/or were not clearly marked.

Details

Interior routes are any hallway or corridor that a voter would have to travel from the accessible entrance to the voting area. These areas should be well lit on Election Day and free from obstacles that could pose a hazard for voters with vision problems or voters who use a wheelchair or walker.

Common obstacles that can be relocated for Election Day include folding tables, trash cans and chairs. Permanent fixtures, such as drinking fountains and display cases, should be marked with a cane-detectable barrier or object such as a traffic cone.